PRESS

“Everyone knows the old joke: HOW MANY GUITARISTS DOES IT TAKE TO SCREW IN A LIGHT BULB? It takes one hundred guitarists…. One guitarist to actually screw it in and ninety-nine guitarists to stand around and say how they could do it better. Metaphorically speaking, Álvaro is the rare dude who has figured out new ways to screw in a light bulb. And all of those ways are ways that nobody else has figured out yet. So, nobody can stand around and say that they could do it better. It’s really new stuff – the first time you will hear anyone doing what he is doing. That’s my favorite kind of guitar surprise. I urge you to check his The Compass CD out!” Henry Kaiser

 

“The remarkable guitarist and composer from Madrid, Álvaro Domene – based in New York since 2015- has become, on his own merits, one of the most promising representatives of the new creative music. ” Sergio Piccirilli, El Intruso

 

Ambient clean tones morph into Wagnerian waves of distortion, as he employs the entire range of his 7-string guitar. Álvaro Domene has mastered the art of turning non-pitched abrasive sounds into a kind of beauty.” – Michael Ross, Guitar Moderne.

Read full in-depth interview with Guitar Moderne HERE

 

“Álvaro Domene, Michaël Attias, and Mike Pride. Total facemelt music. Just what I needed today. –  Nate Chinen (New York Times, NPR)

 

“Jesus!! Incredible phrasing and linear directional shifts, beautiful!! – Matte Henderson.

 

“El notable guitarrista y compositor madrileño Álvaro Domene -con residencia en la ciudad de Nueva York desde 2015- se ha constituido por mérito propio en uno de los representantes más promisorios de la nueva música creativa.” – Sergio Piccirilli, El Intruso

 

Immense show. Álvaro’s deep slabs of hardened steel, gut and gristle were sometimes Wagnerian, sometimes hardcore mathcore, with Michaël Attias’ alto standing in for human yearning and vulnerability in the face of overwhelming power, like Lear against the storm, with the ever-inventive Mike Pride building backbones for every surprising sonic beast as it appeared. Wonderful!” – Steve Ventura, Quinn’s.

 

“Things start out easily enough with “Temor V” on guitarist Álvaro Domene’s solo recording. Dreamy notes wash over a shoreline that could go on indefinitely. But there is an ominous tone hovering above the music. Domene controls the weather through heavy chords and sustain. Thunder rumbles and…well, is resolved with the most refrain. You know he is just playing with you. These ten tracks, half improvised/half composed, draw inspiration from ambient soundscapes and heavy metal explorations. The guitarist is a connoisseur of both noise and extended technique, kind of like Robert Fripp-meets-Merzbow.
That said, we understand Domene’s process to be detailed and attentive. He slags heavy drones, mixing them à la Sunn O))) with dark metal ambience that skirts the fringes of rock, noise, free improvisation, and nightmare. If it weren’t for the extraordinary control, terror might ensue. “Fermi Paradox” takes its initial cues from the stylings of Derek Bailey‘s fingerings before inflating into the worlds of Sonny Sharrock and the Melvins. But wait, there’s more. Domene can hypnotize you with his seventh string, a bass-line that sets up the mesmeric piece “Pendulum,” which swings between deftly plucked notes.” – Mark Corroto, All About Jazz

 

“Domene has given us a solo album that offers a different take on the modern electric guitar. An impressive outing wherein technique is clearly on display yet always in service to the compositions. Álvaro informs us ( if you hear ) of his very unique influences and has assimilated them into an organic language all his own. I hope there is more to come.” – Thano Lomiento

 

Both Briggan Krauss and Álvaro Domene are well-seasoned and sound like they are coming from a common place of mature and thoughtfully crafted improv. Extraordinary!”  – Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery, NYC

 

If you are of the opinion that the best way to save jazz is to raze it, then the demolition team of dMu is just the ticket. Just as DIY punk saved rock music in the 1970s and 80s (only to see it back on life support in the 21st century), the trio of saxophonist Josh Sinton, guitarist Álvaro Domene, and drummer Mike Caratti has an appetite for destruction. Their power trio, named after a Tibetan mythological demon, purposefully conjures a feverish tumult throughout the six tracks, all composed by Caratti. Opening with the stuttering “Onda,” the trio plunges towards an organized chaos of overblown baritone sax, rip/torn guitar notes and monster beats. Sinton and Domene charge, often in lockstep, into the void.
The closest comparison here might be to The Thing, when Ingebrigt Håker Flaten swaps acoustic for electric bass. dMu shares the same avant/garage/punk/jazz attitude. Like the DIY punk revolution, it is vitriol (and venom) that powers this music. With a dynamo like Sinton and the shred-ready nimbleness of Domene, we are given a tinderbox, one that finds its accelerant in Caratti’s pulse. The music, though, is distinct from punk in that these are first rate musicians negotiating some tricky compositions. The intricacies and twists of “Lake Disappointment” and “Dropsy” are jaw-dropping, amazing. Don’t let the sweat stained exhaustion of a listening session with dMu deceive you, it’s just the Tibetan sorcery working.”–Mark Corroto, All About Jazz

 

The atmosphere the duo develops is enveloping, the slow ooze at the start is created by Krauss’ intensely rhythmic phrases and Domene’s deliberate chordal movement. The fog burns off quickly though as the two engage in an intensely percussive passage that raises the tempo and quickens the pulse. Throughout the performance, they move seamlessly from sound-sculpting to earth-scorching.” – Paul Acquaro from The Free Jazz Blog

 

Great writing, unbelievable playing, and a superb recording.”–  Ben Goldberg

 

“This live document was recorded in Brooklyn, 2016, and features two very distinctive voices. Spanish-born guitarist Álvaro Domene and American saxophonist Briggan Krauss. The guitarist, new to the New York scene, paired up with a veteran of the Uptown/Downtown wars. Krauss’ work, beside his recordings, includes Wayne Horvitz‘ Pigpen and Zony Mash, Bakas, Jerry Granelli, Steven Bernstein‘s Sexmob, and Satoko Fujii‘s Orchestra New York. The meat of this recording is the 40-minute opener which sneaks in on little Carl Sandberg cat paws. Krauss has quietly overblown alto saxophone notes and Domene maintains the same confidentiality. The pair suggest we relax and ready ourselves for the journey. This is patient music making. The saxophonist exploits the edges of his horn bending notes and pitches like, well, like Domene does, with his guitar foot pedals. As you might expect, the energy ramps up, building to a thunderous crescendo, then a busy solo rat-tat-tat by Krauss. Domene accents swirls and fills behind the saxophone, creating a dreamscape before laying down his own blanket of notes both beautiful and, at times, machine-like harsh. This is a co-exploration of sound, a true partnership of determination.” – Mark Corroto, All About Jazz

 

 

“dMu is an avant-garde metal and jazz fusion coalescence with baritone sax, bass clarinet, electric guitars, and heavy drums. Synaptic Self is an album of pure and masochistic ecstasy. It’s a truly creative, visceral, and memorable album unlike any other. A must.David Tremblay, Can This Even Be Called Music?